GREEN IS NOT ONLY FOR ST PATRICK’S DAY!

GREEN IS NOT ONLY FOR ST. PATRICK’S DAY Are you interested in loosing weight or just staying in shape? Eating green vegetables are filling, extremely nutritious and very low in calories. In the amounts commonly consumed, green leafy vegetables provide an abundance of roughage or fiber, which is an important component of a healthful diet. The greener the leaf, the higher the carotene content. Carotene from leafy vegetables is more readily absorbed and utilized than that from yellow ones. Fresh vegetable leaves are also good sources of vitamin C, unfortunately, much of this ascorbic acid is often lost before consumption, through oxidation and leaching during preparation. Though little carotene is lost in cooking, portions of water-soluble vitamins and appreciable quantities of iron, magnesium, and phosphorus may be lost if the cooking water of leafy vegetables is discarded. On a calorie by-calorie-basis, green vegetables contain significantly more fiber than whole grains. As an example: 2 slices of whole-wheat bread –about 140 calories, 4 gms of fiber, 140 mgs of potassium vs 2 cups of broccoli—87 calories, 9 gms of fiber, 1,000 mgs of potassium. Although it is recommended to consume a minimum of 25-30gms/day the average American consumes 15 gms of fiber/day. Diets low in fiber may underlie or exacerbate constipation, appendicitis, hemorrhoids, deep-vein thrombosis, varicose veins, diverticulitis, hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux. Fiber is thought to help prevent colon cancer, diabetes and heart disease. Promoting good health includes the necessity to eat potassium-rich foods which are vegetables and fruits primarily, as well as animal protein and potatoes. Research recommends 7,000-11,000mg of potassium/day which should come from your diet. However,...

6 Simple keys to Keeping Your Heart Strong

6 SIMPLE KEYS TO KEEPING YOUR HEART STRONG WHY THE FUSS ABOUT CHOLESTEROL? It is a fatty, waxy material that is found in high-fat meat and dairy products, as well as egg yolks, organ meats and shellfish. Because of the essential role cholesterol plays in every cell of the body to help digest fats, strengthen cell membranes, and make hormones – the body creates all it needs on its own – about 1,000 mg a day. In order for cholesterol to reach our cells, it must rely on special carriers called lipoproteins: low-density lipoproteins (LDL)-“bad” form and high-density lipoproteins (HDL)-‘good” form of cholesterol. LDL carries cholesterol through the body and deposits it in the cells. HDL transports any cholesterol the cells don’t need to the liver, where it eventually gets processed and eliminated. Although various body tissues remove LDL cholesterol from the bloodstream and then use it to make cell membranes, bile acids, vitamin D and various hormones, once the tissues have acquired all the cholesterol they need, they stop extracting LDL cholesterol from the bloodstream. The extra cholesterol, which happens when we eat too many foods high in cholesterol, continues to circulate in your arteries. LDL deposits the excess cholesterol onto artery walls, where it forms plaque that clogs the blood vessels and can ultimately lead to heart disease or even a heart attack. A good idea is to keep your LDL cholesterol level under 2.5 mmol/L (96 mg/dL) and your total cholesterol about 3.9 mmol/L (150 mg/dL)-4.7 mmol/L (180 mg/dL). WHAT ABOUT THE CHOLESTEROL LOWERING DRUGS CALLED STATINS? New research has shown that 1/2 the people who...

Green Is Not Only For St Patrick’s Day

GREEN IS NOT ONLY FOR ST. PATRICK’S DAY Are you interested in loosing weight or just staying in shape?  Eating green vegetables are filling, extremely nutritious and very low in calories.  In the amounts commonly consumed, green leafy vegetables provide an abundance of roughage or fiber, which is an important component of a healthful diet.  The greener the leaf, the higher the carotene content.   Carotene from leafy vegetables is more readily absorbed and utilized than that from yellow ones.  Fresh vegetable leaves are also good sources of vitamin C, unfortunately, much of this ascorbic acid is often lost before consumption, through oxidation and leaching during preparation.  Though little carotene is lost in cooking, portions of water-soluble vitamins and appreciable quantities of iron, magnesium, and phosphorus may be lost if the cooking water of leafy vegetables is discarded. On a calorie by-calorie-basis, green vegetables contain significantly more fiber than whole grains.  As an example:  2 slices of whole-wheat bread –about 140 calories, 4 gms of fiber, 140mgs of potassium vs 2 cups of broccoli—87 calories, 9 gms of fiber, 1,000mgs of potassium. Although it is recommended to consume a minimum of 25-30gms/day the average American consumes 15 gms of fiber/day. Diets low in fiber may underlie or exacerbate constipation, appendicitis, hemorrhoids, deep-vein thrombosis, varicose veins, diverticulitis, hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux.  Fiber is thought to help prevent colon cancer, diabetes and heart disease. Promoting good health includes the necessity to eat potassium-rich foods which are vegetables and fruits primarily, as well as animal protein and potatoes.  Research recommends 7,000-11,000mg of potassium/day which should come from your diet.  However, the average...

6 KEYS TO A HEALTHY HEART

6 KEYS TO A HEALTHY HEART LIFESTYLES CHANGES FOR A HEALTHY HEART WHY THE FUSS ABOUT CHOLESTEROL? It is a fatty, waxy material that is found in high-fat meat and dairy products, as well as egg yolks, organ meats and shellfish. Because of the essential role cholesterol plays in every cell of the body to help digest fats, strengthen cell membranes, and make hormones – the body creates all it needs on its own – about 1,000 mg a day. In order for cholesterol to reach our cells, it must rely on special carriers called lipoproteins: low-density lipoproteins (LDL)-“bad” form and high-density lipoproteins (HDL)-‘good” form of cholesterol. LDL carries cholesterol through the body and deposits it in the cells. HDL transports any cholesterol the cells don’t need to the liver, where it eventually gets processed and eliminated. Although various body tissues remove LDL cholesterol from the bloodstream and then use it to make cell membranes, bile acids, vitamin D and various hormones, once the tissues have acquired all the cholesterol they need, they stop extracting LDL cholesterol from the bloodstream. The extra cholesterol, which happens when we eat too many foods high in cholesterol, continues to circulate in your arteries. LDL deposits the excess cholesterol onto artery walls, where it forms plaque that clogs the blood vessels and can ultimately lead to heart disease or even a heart attack. A good idea is to keep your LDL cholesterol level under 2.5 mmol/L (96 mg/dL) and your total cholesterol about 3.9 mmol/L (150 mg/dL)-4.7 mmol/L (180 mg/dL). WHAT ABOUT THE CHOLESTEROL LOWERING DRUGS CALLED STATINS? New research has shown that...

High on Sugar? Low on Brain Thinking?

HIGH ON SUGAR?   LOW ON BRAIN THINKING? 4 Strategies For Brain Power Yum, the smell of freshly baked chocolate chip cookies or cinnamon rolls. Tastes good, BUT the overindulgence of sugar and grains is now being linked to changes in brain health including memory loss, inability to concentrate, brain fog and senile dementia which is now being called diabetes type 3. Your diet today plays a significant role in your cognition for tomorrow. A new study has revealed the overloading of carbohydrates and sugar contributes to problems in judgment, thinking and language over time, however, protein, healthy fats and fermented vegetables were brain protective. WHAT DOES TOO MUCH SUGAR DO TO YOUR BRAIN? The consistent overload of high levels of insulin eventually cause its insulin signaling to shut down which can lead to permanent brain damage. This drop in glucose to your brain cells may lead to degeneration and cognitive impairment as your brain also produces insulin. We are now seeing how the same process leading to Type 2 Diabetes may also be consistent for your brain. Regularly eating more than 25 grams of fructose per day, will increase the risk of you developing Alzheimer’s as well as maintaining proper insulin levels. HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH PROTEIN? Rule of thumb is not to exceed one gram of protein per kilogram of lean body mass. Your lean body mass can be calculated by finding out your percent of body fat and subtracting that from 100. Then multiply that times your current weight to get your lean body mass. If you need to reduce your protein, replace the calories with...

Declare Your Independence From Pain-4 Easy Steps

Declare Your Independence from Pain-4 Easy Steps ARE YOU LIVING IN A HOUSE OF PAIN? “My back for no apparent reason was so painful.  I couldn’t move.  After two days in bed a friend recommended I see Dr. Rosenfeld.  I could barely drive or sit when I came in.  This had happened several times in the past twenty years.   A medical doctor had given me muscle relaxers only.  They weren’t all that helpful but over time and with restricting activities I got better.  I experienced miraculous results after visiting Dr. Rosenfeld.  I am able to do more than before in movement and strength with no pain, my whole outlook each day is more positive and I feel more energized.” GM What to do to decrease pain? 1. Use RICE method–Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation–for initial 24-72 hours after an injury.  Ice for 20 min about every hour or two.  Then alternate: heat 10 min, ice 10 min, heat 10 min.  2. Eat a diet rich in whole, unprocessed foods emphasizing magnesium and calcium foods found in: kale, collard greens, almonds, blackberries, mustard greens, oatmeal, oranges, navy beans and sunflower seeds.  Avoid or limit foods that contribute to acidity such as refined sugars, caffeine, salty foods and alcohol.  Limit foods high in saturated fats, including red meats, dairy products, warm-water shellfish and partially-hydrogenated oil. Drink chlorophyll-rich, green drinks, such as extracts of wheat grass.  Eat more fatty fish (mackerel, herring and salmon) and preferably wild.  Decrease animal fat consumption as it is a primary source of arachidonic acid, a precursor of a number of inflammatory prostaglandins.  Identify and avoid food allergens.  We have...

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